Artificial intelligence in all its forms at the Las Vegas tech show

Artificial intelligence in all its forms at the Las Vegas tech show

“Last year, generative artificial intelligence was just a flash at CES. It will be the crown jewel this year,” said Dipanjan Chatterjee, analyst at Forrester. (Photo: 123RF)

The major annual gathering of electronics giants, automakers and technology start-ups kicks off Tuesday in Las Vegas under the banner of generative artificial intelligence (AI), which is expected to give a new dimension to everyday devices.

“Last year, generative artificial intelligence was just a flash at CES. It will be the crown jewel this year,” said Dipanjan Chatterjee, analyst at Forrester.

The city in the western United States will welcome more than 3,500 exhibitors and approximately 130,000 attendees spread across several hotels and conference centers for the 2024 CES (Consumer Electronics Show) from January 9 to 12.

There will be few presentations and talks that do not mention AI.

Because although the technology is not new, the generative artificial intelligence programs popularized by ChatGPT over the past year go far beyond large-scale data processing, producing text, images and sounds at a simple query in ordinary language.

“For a show that began in 1967 and was the founding event of the 1990s tech boom, the buzz and excitement is already well suited to this period of disruption looming on the horizon with the AI ​​revolution,” commented analyst Dan Ives. of Wedbush Securities.

At a preview for journalists on Monday, South Korean electronics giant LG presented, for example, a new small robot on wheels capable of interacting with the entire household, adults, children and pets.

Thanks to AI, it will be able to “move, learn, understand and participate in complex conversations”, the company assures, promoting its “vision of a house without work”.

“Smarter than ever”

Specifically, it is equipped with sensors, a microphone and a camera to play music selected based on the emotions it has detected on passengers’ faces, remind them of appointments or medicines to take, inform them of the weather or watch their dog when they are away. home.

From health to cars, companies are competing with prototypes and announcements on human-serving machines that are increasingly sophisticated and communicative.

At Sunday’s Unveiled exhibition, attendees could test headphones capable of translating several languages ​​at the same time and very friendly robots.

“It’s no coincidence that we’re starting with artificial intelligence,” Brian Comiskey, a researcher at CTA, the show’s organizer, said Sunday during a technology trends conference. “Tomorrow will be smarter than ever.”

The expert highlighted the rapid progress of the microchip industry, the “brains” of AI innovation and Microsoft’s first keyboard change in decades with the addition of a “Copilot” key for direct access to Windows’ AI generative tools.

“This shows that AI equipment will be at the center of discussions for several years,” he pointed out.

“Smartphone mounted on wheels”

Monday was mainly dedicated to announcements about new televisions and cars.

“CES will continue to showcase larger, connected 8K or microLED displays, advanced devices, more powerful computers, and electric car prototypes from Honda, Hyundai and others,” noted Forrester’s Thomas Husson.

“But the show is becoming less about hardware and devices and more about AI and software integration,” he added.

According to the CTA, US consumers will spend approximately $157 billion on software in 2023, primarily video games and video applications. This number is expected to rise to US$163 billion this year.

“With electric cars, users want driver assistance and safety, but also services like entertainment,” said Jessica Boothe, director of research at the CTA. “They see their vehicle as a smartphone mounted on wheels.

Volkswagen on Monday unveiled its first vehicles with ChatGPT integrated into its voice assistant. It will therefore be able to converse with the driver and give him answers to his questions in real time.

The same prediction for televisions, which can no longer be satisfied with their role as screens.

“They will become control centers for the home, connecting to kitchen appliances, washing machines, security cameras…” Jessica Boothe described.

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